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Alcohol and Breastfeeding

Can I drink alcohol if I am breastfeeding? If you want to, you can enjoy a glass of wine, a beer or whatever it is that you choose to drink.  The key is to plan ahead. The concentration of alcohol in your blood is the concentration of alcohol in your milk. Alcohol gets into your breastmilk from your blood, moving freely from the blood to the breastmilk (and back out again). To know when your breastmilk is free of alcohol, I suggest the Milk screen Alcohol Test.  Alcohol will be in your breastmilk 30–60 minutes after you start drinking. A number of factors affect how much alcohol gets into your breastmilk, including: the strength and amount of alcohol in your drink...

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Maximising Milk Production Video

When an infant is unable to breastfeed effectively, and his mother needs to stimulate the breasts and express milk with a breast pump, building and maintaining an adequate supply can be a challenge. This video demonstrates some ways that pumping mothers can increase production without medication. This video is by Stanford see link below: https://med.stanford.edu/newborns/professional-education/breastfeeding/maximizing-milk-production.html

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Reflux? Colic? Unsettled baby

Reflux is when the contents of the stomach are regurgitated (brought back up), either up the oesophagus (food tube) or into the mouth. The medical term for reflux is gastro-oesophageal reflux, or GOR. Most reflux is swallowed back into the stomach, but occasionally your baby will vomit it out of their mouth (which is sometimes called posseting).  Although it can be very alarming for parents at first, reflux is very common in babies, and will most likely get better on its own by the time your child is one year old. In most cases, reflux will not harm your baby, and does not need any medical treatment. It is unlikely to cause problems later on in life. In some instances, reflux...

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Breastfeeding Fact or Ficton?

Truth: It is not normal for breastfeeding to hurt Many mothers feel some nipple pain that ceases beyond the initial attachment in the early weeks. If pain lasts beyond the initial attachment or if there are signs of nipple damage, these things usually mean that a baby is not attached well to his mother’s breast.  If your nipple becomes sore after a period of comfortable feeding, you may have a nipple infection. If breastfeeding hurts, you need to see a Lactation Consultant. Truth: Most mothers can produce enough breastmilk Most mothers can make more than enough milk for their baby (or babies!). Indeed, having too much breastmilk is common. In many cases if a Mum has a low supply it is because the baby is not taking enough...

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Is your baby getting enough milk?

How do I know if my baby is getting enough breastmilk? If your baby shows the following signs then it is likely that you do have enough milk.   · At least 6 to 8 heavily soaked wet nappies in 24 hours. The urine should be odourless and clear/very pale in colour. Strong, dark urine suggest that the baby needs more breastmilk and you should discuss with your LMC. · A young baby will usually have 3 or more soft or runny bowel movements each day for several weeks. An older baby is likely to have fewer bowel movements than this. Formed bowel motions suggest that the baby needs more breastmilk and you should discuss with your LMC. · Good...

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